NYC Students, Parents and Teachers Urge DOE to Be a Leader in Creating Safe School Climate

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:  Shoshi Doza, Dignity in Schools Campaign-NY, 347-632-7315

Kesi Foster, Urban Youth Collaborative, 646-404-4947

                                      **Media advisory for January 25, 5:00 pm Outside MS 131, 100 Hester Street**

                      NYC Students, Parents and Teachers Urge DOE to Be a Leader in Creating Safe School Climate

 

WHAT:  Press Conference to Push for Discipline Code Changes and Restorative Justice in NYC Schools

WHEN: January 25, 2017 and 5:00 p.m.

WHERE: 100 Hester Street, MS 131

WHO: Students, Parents, Educators, Elected Officials, Civil Rights Advocates


Students, parents, educators, elected officials, and civil rights advocates will speak out at the NYC Department of Education (DOE) Public Hearing on the School Discipline Code to urge the Department of Education to eliminate racial discrimination in school discipline and policing.

The Department of Education has made incremental progress in reducing the use of punitive discipline, but New York City remains to have some of the highest racial disparities in the nation. Now more than ever the Mayor’s Administration and Department of Education needs to take leadership and ensure approaches and outcomes across school discipline reflect the values of fairness and equity that for too long has eluded students of color. Changing racial inequities means embracing and implementing bold policy reforms and prioritizing funding for restorative practices and mental health supports

The Dignity in Schools Campaign-New York (DSC-NY) is calling on the Mayor and DOE to continue progress towards the goals outlined by the Mayor's Leadership Team. We have to pass policy reforms that will reduce racial disparities. We are calling for the Mayor to end  suspensions for the subjective Discipline Code Infractions A22/B21 for insubordination or defying authority; fulfilling their commitment to end suspensions for K-2nd grade students; removing the term “gang” in the K-5 discipline code, limiting the use of long-term suspensions, and re-prioritizing funding for Restorative Justice.

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